Who is Dominic Raab and what’s the Brexit Secretary said about the Calais-Dover crossing?

DOMINIC Raab replaced David Davis as Theresa May’s main man negotiating a deal to leave the EU.

Here’s everything you need to know about the Brexit Secretary.

 The Tory MP and Brexiteer, 44, played a prominent role in the Leave campaign in 2016

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The Tory MP and Brexiteer, 44, played a prominent role in the Leave campaign in 2016

Who is Dominic Raab?

The Tory MP and Brexiteer, 44, played a prominent role in the Leave campaign in 2016.

He served as housing minister and as a justice minister before his promotion to the Cabinet.

Before going into politics he was a lawyer, working on EU and World Trade Organisation law, making him a good fit for the crucial role leading the Department for Exiting The EU.

He began his Westminster career at the Foreign Office in 2000, and led the British team at The Hague dedicated to bringing war criminals to justice.

He also advised on the Arab-Israeli Conflict, the EU and Gibraltar, before being hired by David Davis – the man he has replaced – in 2006.

Raab worked as Mr Davis’ chief of staff while he served as shadow home secretary, until he was elected to Parliament in 2010 as MP for Esher and Walton.

Dominic was born in 1974 to a Czech-born Jewish father, who came to Britain in 1938 as a refugee.

He studied law at Oxford and then Cambridge before becoming a solicitor.

His is married to Erika Rey, a Brazilian marketing executive, and the pair live in Thames Ditton in Surrey with their two children.

 

 He studied law at Oxford and then Cambridge before becoming a solicitor

JEFF OVERS

He studied law at Oxford and then Cambridge before becoming a solicitor

What did Raab say about the Calais-Dover crossing?

France could wreak massive damage on Britain’s economy by closing down Calais under a no deal Brexit.

If negotiations fail and Theresa May refuses to pay the UK’s £39bn divorce bill, it is feared President Macron could immediately retaliate by creating chaos with cross-channel trade.

As the nation’s only major roll-on roll-off ferry hub, the Dover-Calais crossing has been identified by DexEU officials as Britain major strategic weak point.

France has the power to spark huge delays for UK-bound lorries importing factory parts for ‘just in time’ supply chains such as car factories.

Blocking off Dover from us would hugely damage our economy by squeezing the crucial Dover-Calais trade route.

Dominic Raab said that he didn’t understand the importance of the Calais-Dover crossing for the UK trade.

He said: “I hadn’t quite understood the full extent of this, but if you look at the UK and look at how we trade in goods, we are particularly reliant on the Dover-Calais crossing.

“And that is one of the reasons why we have wanted to make sure we have a specific and very proximate relationship with the EU, to ensure friction-less trade at the border.”

What would Brexit mean for the Irish border?

The EU has suggested a backstop that would see Northern Ireland staying in the customs union, the EU VAT system and parts of the single market.

This will essentially draw a customs border down the middle of the Irish Sea, potentially damaging the union of the UK.

Mrs May has suggested a backstop that will see all of the UK aligned with the EU customs union for a limited time after 2020.

Brussels has two issues with May’s plan.

The first is that May wants the backstop to come to an end after a certain time period; the EU thinks this would be self-defeating as it’s possible no solution for the Irish border would be found.

The EU also thinks this risks leaving Britain benefiting from the customs union and single market for years after Brexit.